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    Wednesday, November 30, 2011

    Reuter site - RIM to offer security features for iPhone, Android

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSTRE7AS0A720111129

    RIM to offer security features for iPhone, Android

    Tue, Nov 29 16:54 PM EST

    By Alastair Sharp

    TORONTO (Reuters) - Research In Motion is introducing a software tool that gives corporate customers the option of linking employees' personal iPhones to the BlackBerry network without compromising security.

    The move, announced on Tuesday, is RIM's first tangible acknowledgment that it has lost its iron grip on the corporate smartphone market and must accommodate the growing preference of workers for Apple and Google's Android devices. Its battered shares jumped on the announcement.

    "It's not an admission of guilt - it's a necessary evil," Suquehanna analyst Jeff Fidacaro said.

    RIM's Mobile Fusion service is designed to give the Canadian company the leading role in managing corporate communications, whether over the BlackBerry or a rival device.

    "What our enterprise customers are looking for, and the opportunity for us, is to become the de facto platform," Alan Panezic, RIM's vice-president for enterprise product management, said in an interview ahead of the announcement.

    Taking a first, tentative step to offer its network services independently of its own devices, the company could develop a fresh source of revenue to offset a shrinking market share in handsets.

    Indeed, success with the strategy could encourage RIM to focus more and more on services rather than devices.

    RIM's often-volatile stock closed 5.4 percent higher at $17.37 on Nasdaq and up 5.5 percent at C$17.95 in Toronto. It still down more than 70 percent this year following a string of delayed or botched product launches, and disappointing quarterly results.

    RIM's BlackBerry was for years the preferred device for businesses and government agencies, who treasured its encrypted data and distributed the device to millions of workers needing secure, round-the-clock email access.

    But many workers now prefer using their own Apple and Android-powered devices to access corporate emails, raising security questions for corporations, which RIM hopes to address with the new software.

    "While a positive step, the larger challenges remain RIM's need to narrow competitive gaps in its handsets," RBC Capital Markets analyst Mike Abramsky wrote in a note to clients. He pointed to RIM's software deficiencies and limited content and applications available on its devices.

    RIM's slice of the lucrative U.S. smartphone market fell to 9 percent in the third quarter, down from 24 percent a year earlier, according to research firm Canalys. Globally, the report placed RIM in fifth place, with 10 percent market share, compared with 15 percent a year earlier.

    DUE BY LATE MARCH

    Mobile Fusion, due in late March, will allow corporate information technology staff to set and monitor rules for passwords, apps and software on a range of devices, including Apple's iPad and iPhone, and smartphones using the Android operating system.

    A company can remotely lock or wipe a lost or stolen device, a key selling point for security-conscious corporations that may have been wary of shifting away from the BlackBerry.

    "We will take full advantage of whatever security capabilities are provided by the core operating system. We're not going to hold that back in any way, shape or form," Panezic said.

    Mobile Fusion will include and extend existing BlackBerry Enterprise Servers, or BES, behind corporate firewalls.

    Panezic said the software will manage RIM's PlayBook independently from a BlackBerry after the tablet - which has yet to gain traction with either businesses or consumers - receives a long-awaited software upgrade, due in February.

    He declined to give any pricing details for the Fusion service, but said it would be competitive with rivals.

    "It will help stem the tide of those companies that may have considered eliminating their BES but it won't help sell more phones," said Gartner analyst Phillip Redman. "That's what they really need to do."

    "RATTLE SOME CAGES"

    RIM has recently launched touchscreen devices using its legacy BlackBerry operating system as it works to put the QNX software powering the PlayBook on to a new generation of phones from early next year.

    The new software follows on from the acquisition of device management company Ubitexx, which RIM announced in May.

    Smaller companies such as Good Technology, MobileIron and BoxTone already offer device management as companies fret about leakage of sensitive commercial information via their workers' personal, non-BlackBerry devices.

    "This will definitely rattle some cages" among firms that filled a niche by securing and managing iPhones and other non-BlackBerry devices for corporations, Forrester analyst Christian Kane said.

    Panezic said customers had requested a solution to handle Apple and Android devices, but RIM would consider adding support for other systems, such as Microsoft's Windows Phone, if it saw enough demand.

    ($1=$1.03 Canadian)

    (Reporting by Alastair Sharp; editing by Frank McGurty)

    Sunday, November 27, 2011

    CNN - Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation

    Sent from bombastic4000@yahoo.com's mobile device from http://m.cnn.com.

    Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation


    Syracuse University has fired Bernie Fine as an assistant men's basketball coach, the school announced Sunday night, hours after new reports arose regarding his alleged sexual abuse of boys.

    "At the direction of Chancellor Cantor, Bernie Fine's employment with Syracuse University has been terminated, effective immediately," university Senior Vice President Kevin Quinn said in a statement, referring to Syracuse Chancellor Nancy Cantor.

    Fine was placed on administrative leave earlier this month, after former Syracuse ball boy Bobby Davis and his stepbrother, Mike Lang, accused him of molesting them. The university in announcing Fine's leave earlier this month noted it had conducted its own investigation in 2005 and was "unable to find any corroboration of the allegations."

    "The events of the past week have shaken us all," Cantor said in a statement Sunday. "No other witnesses came forward during the university investigation (in 2005), and those who felt they knew Bernie best could not imagine what has unfolded."

    Syracuse men's basketball head coach Jim Boeheim said in a statement Sunday night that he believed "the university took the appropriate step" in firing Fine, his assistant coach the past 35 years.

    "The allegations that have come forth today are disturbing and deeply troubling. I am personally very shocked because I have never witnessed any of the activities that have been alleged," said Boeheim, who days earlier said Fine had his "full support." "I deeply regret any statements I made that might have inhibited that from occurring or been insensitive to victims of abuse."

    The news of Fine's firing came the same day that the Syracuse-based Post-Standard newspaper and ESPN both reported the existence of a recording of a 2002 phone conversation that they said Davis had recorded between him and the coach's wife.

    What did Fine's wife know?

    Davis provided the recording to the Post-Standard soon after it was recorded, but the newspaper then declined to report on it because it couldn't find "witnesses, enough corroborating evidence or a second accuser."

    The wife, Laurie Fine, at the time suggested to the Post-Standard that Davis had taped her on multiple occasions and edited the recordings to make them appear more inflammatory.

    In the tape, a woman -- which ESPN, citing experts, claims was Laurie Fine -- said she knew "everything that went on" with her husband, adding that "he thinks he's above the law."

    "Bernie has issues ... and you trusted somebody you shouldn't," the woman said, speaking to Davis.

    The woman appears to acknowledge an inappropriate sexual relationship between Davis and Bernie Fine, saying, "It's just wrong and you were a kid." She also said that her husband should "find (himself) a gay boy, get your rocks off."

    Repeated calls by CNN to Laurie Fine were unanswered Sunday, and no one answered repeated knocks on the door of her house.

    Cantor, the Syracuse chancellor, said the school did not know of the recording during its 2005 investigation.

    Bernie Fine's attorneys, Donald Martin and Karl Sleight, released a statement Sunday -- hours before their client's firing was announced -- declining to comment on the reports.

    "Any comment from (Fine) would only invite and perpetuate ancient and suspect claims," the lawyers said. "Mr. Fine remains hopeful of a credible and expeditious review of the relevant issues by law enforcement authorities."

    The embattled coach appeared to be getting some support as evidenced by a sign outside his home that read: "We believe in your innocence Bernie. We love you!"

    On Friday, the Secret Service joined local law enforcement to search Fine's home, according to John Duncan, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office in New York's northern district.

    File cabinets were among the items taken from the home after the search warrant was issued, though Duncan declined to discuss what authorities were looking for.

    Duncan noted that the Secret Service's duties include "investigations into crimes involving electronic transactions." The Secret Service did not comment Sunday on the probe.

    Davis, a former Syracuse ball boy who is now 39, told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "hundreds of times" over the course of 16 years, starting from when he was in the fifth or sixth grade.

    He told university officials six years ago that he informed Syracuse police that he had been "subjected to inappropriate contact by an associate men's basketball coach" during the 1980s and 1990s, according to an earlier statement from Quinn, the school spokesman.

    Police had told Davis years ago that they would not pursue the case because the statute of limitations had expired, Quinn said in a statement.

    On Sunday, another man -- Zachary Tomaselli, now 23 -- told CNN that he also was abused by Fine while in a hotel room in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he'd gone to watch a Syracuse game.

    The incident happened about a decade ago, when he traveled by himself a few months after he'd met Fine, Tomaselli said.

    He claimed that the coach "put his hand down my shorts" as he was watching TV, adding Fine allegedly did so "four or five times."

    Tomaselli said that he agreed with Syracuse's decision to fire Fine, adding the school also owed an apology to the coach's alleged victims.

    The accuser's father, Fred Tomaselli, claimed that while he and his son had sat in "nose-bleed" seats during Syracuse games, they'd never met Fine. Moreover, he said the boy never stayed overnight in a hotel room with Fine, nor had he ever been brought to Pittsburgh or gone to a game there.

    The father said that Zachary Tomaselli's allegation is completely "100% false," suggesting that his son needed help and calling him a "master manipulator." The father and son are estranged.

    Davis' stepbrother, Mike Lang, 45, has also accused Fine of sexual abuse. Lang told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "15 to 20 times," and confirmed the abuse to CNN in a phone interview Sunday.

    While he said that he often found himself "pushing (Fine's) hand away," Lang said that his stepbrother suffered much more than he did.

    He described Bernie Fine as "like a father figure" to both he and Bobby Davis, noting the two then-teenagers attended Bernie's wedding to Laurie 26 years ago.

    Lang said his "hands started shaking" when he heard the apparent voice of Laurie Fine -- as broadcast this weekend on ESPN -- talking to his stepbrother about the alleged abuse.

    Thirty minutes after the story broke earlier this fall about former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who is accused of sexually abusing boys over a span of 14 years, Bobby Davis texted his stepbrother. Lang said the text read: "'This is what happened to me.'"

    Lang's accusation, made after the Sandusky scandal broke, kick-started the reopened police investigation November 17.

    Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick has harshly criticized Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler and Deputy Chief Sean Broton over the handling of a 2002 probe of Fine that began with Davis' allegation.

    Fitzpatrick filed subpoenas for records in the 2002 and current investigations that he said he should readily have access to.

    A 1967 graduate of Syracuse, where he'd been a student manager for the basketball team, Fine rejoined the program nine years later as an assistant coach under Boeheim.

    Prior to his dismissal, he'd been with the Orange ever since -- the longest such streak for an assistant coach in Division I basketball, the school said.

    According to his official biography, which was taken down from Syracuse's website on Sunday night, Fine "has been a tremendous advocate for SU alumni who want to play professional basketball" and "an active member of the Syracuse community."

    Besides his wife, Laurie, he has a son and two daughters, the profile stated.

    CNN - Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation

    Sent from bombastic4000@yahoo.com's mobile device from http://m.cnn.com.

    Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation


    Syracuse University has fired Bernie Fine as an assistant men's basketball coach, the school announced Sunday night, hours after new reports arose regarding his alleged sexual abuse of boys.

    "At the direction of Chancellor Cantor, Bernie Fine's employment with Syracuse University has been terminated, effective immediately," university Senior Vice President Kevin Quinn said in a statement, referring to Syracuse Chancellor Nancy Cantor.

    Fine was placed on administrative leave earlier this month, after former Syracuse ball boy Bobby Davis and his stepbrother, Mike Lang, accused him of molesting them. The university in announcing Fine's leave earlier this month noted it had conducted its own investigation in 2005 and was "unable to find any corroboration of the allegations."

    "The events of the past week have shaken us all," Cantor said in a statement Sunday. "No other witnesses came forward during the university investigation (in 2005), and those who felt they knew Bernie best could not imagine what has unfolded."

    Syracuse men's basketball head coach Jim Boeheim said in a statement Sunday night that he believed "the university took the appropriate step" in firing Fine, his assistant coach the past 35 years.

    "The allegations that have come forth today are disturbing and deeply troubling. I am personally very shocked because I have never witnessed any of the activities that have been alleged," said Boeheim, who days earlier said Fine had his "full support." "I deeply regret any statements I made that might have inhibited that from occurring or been insensitive to victims of abuse."

    The news of Fine's firing came the same day that the Syracuse-based Post-Standard newspaper and ESPN both reported the existence of a recording of a 2002 phone conversation that they said Davis had recorded between him and the coach's wife.

    What did Fine's wife know?

    Davis provided the recording to the Post-Standard soon after it was recorded, but the newspaper then declined to report on it because it couldn't find "witnesses, enough corroborating evidence or a second accuser."

    The wife, Laurie Fine, at the time suggested to the Post-Standard that Davis had taped her on multiple occasions and edited the recordings to make them appear more inflammatory.

    In the tape, a woman -- which ESPN, citing experts, claims was Laurie Fine -- said she knew "everything that went on" with her husband, adding that "he thinks he's above the law."

    "Bernie has issues ... and you trusted somebody you shouldn't," the woman said, speaking to Davis.

    The woman appears to acknowledge an inappropriate sexual relationship between Davis and Bernie Fine, saying, "It's just wrong and you were a kid." She also said that her husband should "find (himself) a gay boy, get your rocks off."

    Repeated calls by CNN to Laurie Fine were unanswered Sunday, and no one answered repeated knocks on the door of her house.

    Cantor, the Syracuse chancellor, said the school did not know of the recording during its 2005 investigation.

    Bernie Fine's attorneys, Donald Martin and Karl Sleight, released a statement Sunday -- hours before their client's firing was announced -- declining to comment on the reports.

    "Any comment from (Fine) would only invite and perpetuate ancient and suspect claims," the lawyers said. "Mr. Fine remains hopeful of a credible and expeditious review of the relevant issues by law enforcement authorities."

    The embattled coach appeared to be getting some support as evidenced by a sign outside his home that read: "We believe in your innocence Bernie. We love you!"

    On Friday, the Secret Service joined local law enforcement to search Fine's home, according to John Duncan, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office in New York's northern district.

    File cabinets were among the items taken from the home after the search warrant was issued, though Duncan declined to discuss what authorities were looking for.

    Duncan noted that the Secret Service's duties include "investigations into crimes involving electronic transactions." The Secret Service did not comment Sunday on the probe.

    Davis, a former Syracuse ball boy who is now 39, told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "hundreds of times" over the course of 16 years, starting from when he was in the fifth or sixth grade.

    He told university officials six years ago that he informed Syracuse police that he had been "subjected to inappropriate contact by an associate men's basketball coach" during the 1980s and 1990s, according to an earlier statement from Quinn, the school spokesman.

    Police had told Davis years ago that they would not pursue the case because the statute of limitations had expired, Quinn said in a statement.

    On Sunday, another man -- Zachary Tomaselli, now 23 -- told CNN that he also was abused by Fine while in a hotel room in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he'd gone to watch a Syracuse game.

    The incident happened about a decade ago, when he traveled by himself a few months after he'd met Fine, Tomaselli said.

    He claimed that the coach "put his hand down my shorts" as he was watching TV, adding Fine allegedly did so "four or five times."

    Tomaselli said that he agreed with Syracuse's decision to fire Fine, adding the school also owed an apology to the coach's alleged victims.

    The accuser's father, Fred Tomaselli, claimed that while he and his son had sat in "nose-bleed" seats during Syracuse games, they'd never met Fine. Moreover, he said the boy never stayed overnight in a hotel room with Fine, nor had he ever been brought to Pittsburgh or gone to a game there.

    The father said that Zachary Tomaselli's allegation is completely "100% false," suggesting that his son needed help and calling him a "master manipulator." The father and son are estranged.

    Davis' stepbrother, Mike Lang, 45, has also accused Fine of sexual abuse. Lang told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "15 to 20 times," and confirmed the abuse to CNN in a phone interview Sunday.

    While he said that he often found himself "pushing (Fine's) hand away," Lang said that his stepbrother suffered much more than he did.

    He described Bernie Fine as "like a father figure" to both he and Bobby Davis, noting the two then-teenagers attended Bernie's wedding to Laurie 26 years ago.

    Lang said his "hands started shaking" when he heard the apparent voice of Laurie Fine -- as broadcast this weekend on ESPN -- talking to his stepbrother about the alleged abuse.

    Thirty minutes after the story broke earlier this fall about former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who is accused of sexually abusing boys over a span of 14 years, Bobby Davis texted his stepbrother. Lang said the text read: "'This is what happened to me.'"

    Lang's accusation, made after the Sandusky scandal broke, kick-started the reopened police investigation November 17.

    Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick has harshly criticized Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler and Deputy Chief Sean Broton over the handling of a 2002 probe of Fine that began with Davis' allegation.

    Fitzpatrick filed subpoenas for records in the 2002 and current investigations that he said he should readily have access to.

    A 1967 graduate of Syracuse, where he'd been a student manager for the basketball team, Fine rejoined the program nine years later as an assistant coach under Boeheim.

    Prior to his dismissal, he'd been with the Orange ever since -- the longest such streak for an assistant coach in Division I basketball, the school said.

    According to his official biography, which was taken down from Syracuse's website on Sunday night, Fine "has been a tremendous advocate for SU alumni who want to play professional basketball" and "an active member of the Syracuse community."

    Besides his wife, Laurie, he has a son and two daughters, the profile stated.

    CNN - Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation

    Sent from bombastic4000@yahoo.com's mobile device from http://m.cnn.com.

    Syracuse basketball coach fired amid sex abuse investigation


    Syracuse University has fired Bernie Fine as an assistant men's basketball coach, the school announced Sunday night, hours after new reports arose regarding his alleged sexual abuse of boys.

    "At the direction of Chancellor Cantor, Bernie Fine's employment with Syracuse University has been terminated, effective immediately," university Senior Vice President Kevin Quinn said in a statement, referring to Syracuse Chancellor Nancy Cantor.

    Fine was placed on administrative leave earlier this month, after former Syracuse ball boy Bobby Davis and his stepbrother, Mike Lang, accused him of molesting them. The university in announcing Fine's leave earlier this month noted it had conducted its own investigation in 2005 and was "unable to find any corroboration of the allegations."

    "The events of the past week have shaken us all," Cantor said in a statement Sunday. "No other witnesses came forward during the university investigation (in 2005), and those who felt they knew Bernie best could not imagine what has unfolded."

    Syracuse men's basketball head coach Jim Boeheim said in a statement Sunday night that he believed "the university took the appropriate step" in firing Fine, his assistant coach the past 35 years.

    "The allegations that have come forth today are disturbing and deeply troubling. I am personally very shocked because I have never witnessed any of the activities that have been alleged," said Boeheim, who days earlier said Fine had his "full support." "I deeply regret any statements I made that might have inhibited that from occurring or been insensitive to victims of abuse."

    The news of Fine's firing came the same day that the Syracuse-based Post-Standard newspaper and ESPN both reported the existence of a recording of a 2002 phone conversation that they said Davis had recorded between him and the coach's wife.

    What did Fine's wife know?

    Davis provided the recording to the Post-Standard soon after it was recorded, but the newspaper then declined to report on it because it couldn't find "witnesses, enough corroborating evidence or a second accuser."

    The wife, Laurie Fine, at the time suggested to the Post-Standard that Davis had taped her on multiple occasions and edited the recordings to make them appear more inflammatory.

    In the tape, a woman -- which ESPN, citing experts, claims was Laurie Fine -- said she knew "everything that went on" with her husband, adding that "he thinks he's above the law."

    "Bernie has issues ... and you trusted somebody you shouldn't," the woman said, speaking to Davis.

    The woman appears to acknowledge an inappropriate sexual relationship between Davis and Bernie Fine, saying, "It's just wrong and you were a kid." She also said that her husband should "find (himself) a gay boy, get your rocks off."

    Repeated calls by CNN to Laurie Fine were unanswered Sunday, and no one answered repeated knocks on the door of her house.

    Cantor, the Syracuse chancellor, said the school did not know of the recording during its 2005 investigation.

    Bernie Fine's attorneys, Donald Martin and Karl Sleight, released a statement Sunday -- hours before their client's firing was announced -- declining to comment on the reports.

    "Any comment from (Fine) would only invite and perpetuate ancient and suspect claims," the lawyers said. "Mr. Fine remains hopeful of a credible and expeditious review of the relevant issues by law enforcement authorities."

    The embattled coach appeared to be getting some support as evidenced by a sign outside his home that read: "We believe in your innocence Bernie. We love you!"

    On Friday, the Secret Service joined local law enforcement to search Fine's home, according to John Duncan, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office in New York's northern district.

    File cabinets were among the items taken from the home after the search warrant was issued, though Duncan declined to discuss what authorities were looking for.

    Duncan noted that the Secret Service's duties include "investigations into crimes involving electronic transactions." The Secret Service did not comment Sunday on the probe.

    Davis, a former Syracuse ball boy who is now 39, told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "hundreds of times" over the course of 16 years, starting from when he was in the fifth or sixth grade.

    He told university officials six years ago that he informed Syracuse police that he had been "subjected to inappropriate contact by an associate men's basketball coach" during the 1980s and 1990s, according to an earlier statement from Quinn, the school spokesman.

    Police had told Davis years ago that they would not pursue the case because the statute of limitations had expired, Quinn said in a statement.

    On Sunday, another man -- Zachary Tomaselli, now 23 -- told CNN that he also was abused by Fine while in a hotel room in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he'd gone to watch a Syracuse game.

    The incident happened about a decade ago, when he traveled by himself a few months after he'd met Fine, Tomaselli said.

    He claimed that the coach "put his hand down my shorts" as he was watching TV, adding Fine allegedly did so "four or five times."

    Tomaselli said that he agreed with Syracuse's decision to fire Fine, adding the school also owed an apology to the coach's alleged victims.

    The accuser's father, Fred Tomaselli, claimed that while he and his son had sat in "nose-bleed" seats during Syracuse games, they'd never met Fine. Moreover, he said the boy never stayed overnight in a hotel room with Fine, nor had he ever been brought to Pittsburgh or gone to a game there.

    The father said that Zachary Tomaselli's allegation is completely "100% false," suggesting that his son needed help and calling him a "master manipulator." The father and son are estranged.

    Davis' stepbrother, Mike Lang, 45, has also accused Fine of sexual abuse. Lang told ESPN earlier this month that Fine molested him "15 to 20 times," and confirmed the abuse to CNN in a phone interview Sunday.

    While he said that he often found himself "pushing (Fine's) hand away," Lang said that his stepbrother suffered much more than he did.

    He described Bernie Fine as "like a father figure" to both he and Bobby Davis, noting the two then-teenagers attended Bernie's wedding to Laurie 26 years ago.

    Lang said his "hands started shaking" when he heard the apparent voice of Laurie Fine -- as broadcast this weekend on ESPN -- talking to his stepbrother about the alleged abuse.

    Thirty minutes after the story broke earlier this fall about former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who is accused of sexually abusing boys over a span of 14 years, Bobby Davis texted his stepbrother. Lang said the text read: "'This is what happened to me.'"

    Lang's accusation, made after the Sandusky scandal broke, kick-started the reopened police investigation November 17.

    Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick has harshly criticized Syracuse Police Chief Frank Fowler and Deputy Chief Sean Broton over the handling of a 2002 probe of Fine that began with Davis' allegation.

    Fitzpatrick filed subpoenas for records in the 2002 and current investigations that he said he should readily have access to.

    A 1967 graduate of Syracuse, where he'd been a student manager for the basketball team, Fine rejoined the program nine years later as an assistant coach under Boeheim.

    Prior to his dismissal, he'd been with the Orange ever since -- the longest such streak for an assistant coach in Division I basketball, the school said.

    According to his official biography, which was taken down from Syracuse's website on Sunday night, Fine "has been a tremendous advocate for SU alumni who want to play professional basketball" and "an active member of the Syracuse community."

    Besides his wife, Laurie, he has a son and two daughters, the profile stated.

    Thursday, November 17, 2011

    CNN - Occupy Wall Street calls for a national day of action

    Sent from bombastic4000@yahoo.com's mobile device from http://m.cnn.com.

    Occupy Wall Street calls for a national day of action


    Occupy Wall Street protesters called for a national day of action and celebration on Thursday to mark the start of the movement two months ago.

    A "Shut Down Wall Street" breakfast is scheduled for Thursday morning in a downtown park, just before the opening bell of the New York Stock Exchange, according to the group's website.

    In the afternoon, demonstrators plan to spread their message at 16 subway hubs throughout the city's five boroughs, the website says.

    Occupy Wall Street protesters say they want Thursday to be a day of non-violent protests, although it comes a day after a demonstrator was arrested for making violent threats.

    Nkrumah Tinsley, 29, was arrested for making terrorist threats and aggravated harassment on Wednesday evening in Zuccotti Park, where the movement was based, New York City police said.

    Occupy roundup: Movement marks 2 months

    Tinsley is seen in a YouTube video making threats toward a department store. "In a few days, you're going to see what a Molotov cocktail can do to Macy's," he said.

    In another part of the video, Tinsley threatens to burn New York City to the ground on Thursday.

    Wednesday's arrest is Tinsley's second in as many months. He was arrested on October 26 for assaulting a police officer.

    About 200 Occupy Wall Street demonstrators were arrested on Wednesday, police said.

    CNN - Occupy Wall Street calls for a national day of action

    Sent from bombastic4000@yahoo.com's mobile device from http://m.cnn.com.

    Occupy Wall Street calls for a national day of action


    Occupy Wall Street protesters called for a national day of action and celebration on Thursday to mark the start of the movement two months ago.

    A "Shut Down Wall Street" breakfast is scheduled for Thursday morning in a downtown park, just before the opening bell of the New York Stock Exchange, according to the group's website.

    In the afternoon, demonstrators plan to spread their message at 16 subway hubs throughout the city's five boroughs, the website says.

    Occupy Wall Street protesters say they want Thursday to be a day of non-violent protests, although it comes a day after a demonstrator was arrested for making violent threats.

    Nkrumah Tinsley, 29, was arrested for making terrorist threats and aggravated harassment on Wednesday evening in Zuccotti Park, where the movement was based, New York City police said.

    Occupy roundup: Movement marks 2 months

    Tinsley is seen in a YouTube video making threats toward a department store. "In a few days, you're going to see what a Molotov cocktail can do to Macy's," he said.

    In another part of the video, Tinsley threatens to burn New York City to the ground on Thursday.

    Wednesday's arrest is Tinsley's second in as many months. He was arrested on October 26 for assaulting a police officer.

    About 200 Occupy Wall Street demonstrators were arrested on Wednesday, police said.

    Thursday, November 10, 2011

    Reuter site - Adobe throws in towel to Apple in Web software war

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSTRE7A84NO20111110

    Adobe throws in towel to Apple in Web software war

    Thu, Nov 10 06:18 AM EST

    By Jim Finkle

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Adobe Systems Inc halted development of its Flash Player for mobile browsers, surrendering to Apple Inc in a war over Web standards as the company surprised investors with a restructuring plan.

    While the matter might seem like inside baseball for the average person, it is likely to improve the browsing experiences of tens of millions of iPhone and iPad users, who have trouble accessing sites built with Flash.

    That is because Adobe's decision means Web developers who currently use Flash tools to produce Web content will likely move over to the newer HTML5 technology, which Adobe embraced on Wednesday.

    Adobe's concession to Apple and its late founder Steve Jobs, who famously derided Flash as an inefficient power-hog, came as the design software specialist warned that revenue growth will slow next year.

    That is because the company is scaling back development of some products and shifting toward leasing other types of software via the cloud on a subscription basis, instead of selling licenses up front.

    The news, detailed Wednesday at the company's annual analyst day, sent shares in the company tumbling nearly 8 percent.

    Adobe announced a restructuring plan on Tuesday that involves laying off about 7 percent of its workforce.

    Adobe said revenue growth is expected to slow to 4 to 6 percent in fiscal 2012 -- below the roughly 9 percent Wall Street was projecting, on average.

    The company said the revenue shortfall is partly because it plans to scale back promotion of its LiveCycle business process management software and Connect web conferencing businesses. It will stop marketing those products to most customers, though it will continue to support them.

    Analysts were uncertain when Adobe's moves would deliver, despite executives saying that top line growth should return to normal in 2013.

    "Shifting from a license model to a recurring model is hard," said Brigantine Advisors analyst Barbara Coffey.

    "Longer-term, Adobe will be a stronger company. However, in the meantime we believe that the shares will languish until revenue growth is evident."

    VICTORY FOR JOBS

    Adobe's surrender signals the end of a long-running war with Apple that has overshadowed the software maker's other activities.

    At one point in the battle, Steve Jobs wrote a nearly 1,700-word "manifesto," calling Flash unreliable and ill-suited for mobile devices. Adobe retaliated by taking out newspaper ads saying Jobs was just plain wrong.

    Analysts say the cessation on Flash development might be a setback to rivals of Apple who tout the ability to support Flash as a reason to buy their equipment. They include Asustek Computer Inc, Google Inc, HTC Corp, Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc, Research in Motion Ltd and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd.

    "It certainly changes the position a little bit for those who said that iOS products such as iPhone and iPad were disadvantaged for not supporting flash," said Michael Gartenberg, an analyst with Gartner.

    While Adobe only publicly conceded on Wednesday that HTML5 has become the preferred standard for creating mobile browser content, it has long been investing in the technology.

    For example, it worked with magazine publisher Conde Nast for about year developing software that allows for the use of HTML5 technology to publish digital editions of magazines, including the New Yorker and Wired.

    This means any content producer can use Adobe's publishing software to build video and motion graphics suitable for the iPad, as well as most other mobile devices.

    Plus, Adobe incorporated HTML5 into its popular Illustrator and Dreamweaver software programs and highlighted an HTML5 program dubbed Edge for creating animated Web content it highlighted at its analyst meeting.

    The company said it plans to infuse HTML5 technology across its entire product line over the coming years, offering increasingly sophisticated tools and services to design professionals, publishers, retailers and other businesses.

    David Wadhwani, head of Adobe's digital media business unit, said the company was in "close collaboration" with Apple as well as Google, Microsoft Corp and others as it developed these new products.

    "There is rocket science in this," he said. "There is enough innovation here to last a decade."

    He said the company would continue to invest in Flash technology for use in mobile applications that would run on devices through its Adobe AIR platform. To access those applications, a user must first install Adobe's AIR software.

    It will also invest in technology to produce Flash applications for desktop computers, including ones that render 3D graphics.

    Adobe shares closed down 7.7 percent at $28.08 on Nasdaq, while Apple shares were down 2.7 percent at $395.28.

    (Additional reporting by Yinka Adegoke and Jennifer Saba in New York and Poornima Gupta in San Francisco; editing by Edwin Chan, Lisa Von Ahn, Gerald E. McCormick and Andre Grenon)

    (This story was corrected in the ninth paragraph to change the name of LiveCycle software)

    Tuesday, November 8, 2011

    RIM is like...

    Reuter site - RIM dissidents push for change at BlackBerry maker

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSTRE7A758G20111108

    RIM dissidents push for change at BlackBerry maker

    Tue, Nov 08 15:56 PM EST

    By Pav Jordan and Alastair Sharp

    TORONTO (Reuters) - The company that makes the BlackBerry has a short window to revive its sagging share price and shake up its business, or risk the escalation of a dissent movement that claims support from holders of 8 percent of its stock.

    Three Research In Motion shareholders backing a call from merchant bank Jaguar Financial for transformational change at the Canadian smartphone company said the still-informal group was bound to grow if RIM's shares don't rebound soon.

    "I would say that if we are still looking at this stock in this position by the middle of next year then I think there will be a lot more support than just 8 percent," one of the shareholders told Reuters. He said he was not ready to be identified because he did not want to go public with his investment strategy.

    Jaguar says the dissidents want a sale of the company as a whole or in parts, and the replacement of co-CEOs Mike Lazaridis and Jim Balsillie. The pair are RIM's two largest shareholders and the most powerful figures in its management.

    The discontent centers on the BlackBerry maker's poor performance in the face of stiff competition from Apple Inc's iPhone and IPad, and devices powered by Google's Android system. Its stock touched a six-year low of $18.77 last week after figures showed its share of the lucrative U.S. smartphone market had slumped to 9 percent in the third quarter from 24 percent a year earlier.

    Shareholders who back Jaguar said they want to see a share price that is at least in the $40-$60 range. On February 18 it hit a year-high of $70.54 on the Nasdaq.

    "Our valuation is substantially higher than here, certainly north of $50," said one of the dissident shareholder.

    Jaguar says none of the members of Jaguar's informal group know who the others are, and there is no concerted action or decision-making by the group at this point. They are united only by independent conversations with Jaguar, it says.

    Jaguar Chief Executive Vic Alboini says there are 13 shareholders in his camp, but he declined to identify them.

    "There is no collaboration on RIM other than, 'we support the Jaguar initiative to cause corporate governance change, and to push the company to put itself up for sale or pursue strategic options'," Alboini said.

    The point he makes is important because a group of shareholders acting together and holding at least 10 percent of shares is obliged by law to disclose its membership.

    Jaguar has a history of targeting underperforming companies. In 2009, Alboini played a crucial role in scuttling HudBay Mineral's friendly bid for Lundin Mining, successfully appealing the Toronto Stock Exchange's approval of the transaction.

    THE QNX ALTERNATIVE

    In separate conversations with Reuters, the three shareholders said they backed Jaguar because it seeks change, although they don't see the company shake-up advocated by Jaguar as the only possible route.

    All hope RIM can turn its stock price around in coming months as it deploys its new QNX software on handheld devices.

    RIM is counting on the souped-up operating software to help it regain ground lost to Apple and Google. But the company has not yet said when it will expand the use of the new platform, Right now it is only used to power RIM's poorly received PlayBook tablet computer.

    "My concern with RIM as a shareholder is the following: they need to step up the pace of getting the word out on what they are doing," said a second shareholder who backs Jaguar. "I'm behind Jaguar as a way to put the spotlight on this."

    A third investor indicated his company might be willing to go public about its support for Jaguar's demands at a later date if RIM fails to revive its stock price.

    "They are on a short leash at this point," the investor said. "If their Plan A isn't working then we apply pressure."

    Alboini said he has tried to speak to the RIM board but has been rebuffed so far.

    He said the group has held off on demanding an open RIM shareholders meeting, their right as holders of more than 5 percent of the stock. Such a request would require members to reveal their identities as a formal group.

    "We're waiting to see if we can do this in a friendly, logical, methodical manner, and so far we've been unsuccessful, but we're going to keep plugging away," he said. "This is not a sprint. This is a marathon and we have to play our cards right."

    (Reporting by Pav Jordan and Alastair Sharp in Toronto; editing by Janet Guttsman and Frank McGurty)

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