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    The Black Rider

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    Wednesday, May 20, 2009

    Rod Stewrt is 64 Years Old

    In case you wanted to know hold old Rod Stewart was. Her your go, Rod Stewart's age.


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    The Black Rider

    Reuters - Researchers create DVDs with massive storage

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com

    Researchers create DVDs with massive storage

    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 5:5PM UTC

    LONDON (Reuters) - "Five-dimensional" discs with a capacity 10,000 times greater than current DVDs could be on the market within 10 years, researchers reported on Wednesday.

    A team from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia said that by harnessing nanoparticles and a "polarization" dimension to existing technology, storage can be massively boosted without changing the size of a current disc.

    The researchers, who have signed a deal with Samsung Electronics, said the technique had allowed them to store 1.6 terabytes of data on a disc with the potential to one day store up to 10 terabytes.

    One terabyte would be enough to hold 300 feature length films or 250,000 songs.

    "We were able to show how nanostructured material can be incorporated onto a disc in order to increase data capacity, without increasing the physical size of the disc," Min Gu, who worked on the research, said in a statement.

    "These extra dimensions are the key to creating ultra-high capacity discs."

    Discs currently have three spatial dimensions but using nanoparticles the researchers said they were able to introduce a spectral -- or color -- dimension as well as a polarization dimension.

    The researchers, who published their findings in the journal Nature, created the color dimension by inserting gold nanorods -- which form so-called surface plasmons when hit by light -- onto a disc's surface.

    Because nanoparticles react to light according to their shape, this allowed the researchers to record information in a range of different color wavelengths on the same place on the disc.

    Current DVDs are recorded in a single color wavelength using a laser, the researchers said.

    The researchers also created an extra dimension using polarization, a technique in which they projected light waves onto the disc, to record different layers of information at different angles.

    "The polarization can be rotated 360 degrees," another member of the research team James Chon, said in a statement.

    "So for example, we were able to record at zero degree polarization. Then on top of that we were able to record another layer of information at 90 degrees polarization, without them interfering with each other."

    Some issues, such as the speed at which the discs can be written on, need further work but the scientists said their research could have immediate applications in a range of fields.

    For instance, they could help store extremely large medical files such as MRIs as well as financial, military and security areas by offering higher data densities needed for encryption, they added.

    (Reporting by Michael Kahn; editing by Maggie Fox and David Cowell)

    Reuters - Researchers create DVDs with massive storage

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com

    Researchers create DVDs with massive storage

    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 5:5PM UTC

    LONDON (Reuters) - "Five-dimensional" discs with a capacity 10,000 times greater than current DVDs could be on the market within 10 years, researchers reported on Wednesday.

    A team from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia said that by harnessing nanoparticles and a "polarization" dimension to existing technology, storage can be massively boosted without changing the size of a current disc.

    The researchers, who have signed a deal with Samsung Electronics, said the technique had allowed them to store 1.6 terabytes of data on a disc with the potential to one day store up to 10 terabytes.

    One terabyte would be enough to hold 300 feature length films or 250,000 songs.

    "We were able to show how nanostructured material can be incorporated onto a disc in order to increase data capacity, without increasing the physical size of the disc," Min Gu, who worked on the research, said in a statement.

    "These extra dimensions are the key to creating ultra-high capacity discs."

    Discs currently have three spatial dimensions but using nanoparticles the researchers said they were able to introduce a spectral -- or color -- dimension as well as a polarization dimension.

    The researchers, who published their findings in the journal Nature, created the color dimension by inserting gold nanorods -- which form so-called surface plasmons when hit by light -- onto a disc's surface.

    Because nanoparticles react to light according to their shape, this allowed the researchers to record information in a range of different color wavelengths on the same place on the disc.

    Current DVDs are recorded in a single color wavelength using a laser, the researchers said.

    The researchers also created an extra dimension using polarization, a technique in which they projected light waves onto the disc, to record different layers of information at different angles.

    "The polarization can be rotated 360 degrees," another member of the research team James Chon, said in a statement.

    "So for example, we were able to record at zero degree polarization. Then on top of that we were able to record another layer of information at 90 degrees polarization, without them interfering with each other."

    Some issues, such as the speed at which the discs can be written on, need further work but the scientists said their research could have immediate applications in a range of fields.

    For instance, they could help store extremely large medical files such as MRIs as well as financial, military and security areas by offering higher data densities needed for encryption, they added.

    (Reporting by Michael Kahn; editing by Maggie Fox and David Cowell)

    Reuters - Geithner says U.S. making headway in battling crisis

    This article was sent to you from bombastic4000@yahoo.com, who uses Reuters Mobile Site to get news and information on the go. To access Reuters on your mobile phone, go to:
    http://mobile.reuters.com

    Geithner says U.S. making headway in battling crisis

    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 6:19PM UTC

    By Glenn Somerville

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said on Wednesday the Obama administration was making headway in calming financial markets and would have a program to cleanse toxic assets from banks' balance sheets up and running by July.

    He told the Senate Banking Committee the U.S. financial system was "starting to heal" after a period of severe trauma, crediting an array of emergency government programs for helping ease a crisis sparked by a surge in mortgage defaults.

    But Geithner said the outlook remained fragile and the administration had to be cautious about how it uses the dwindling money left in a $700 billion financial rescue fund Congress approved in October.

    "We still face a very challenging economic and financial environment, and we need to be careful to preserve substantial resources and flexibility to deal with future contingencies," he said.

    Geithner estimated about $123.7 billion remained in the fund, down from about $135 billion in March, but he said that reflected a conservative forecast that banks would repay just $25 billion they have received and added that Treasury might not finance other programs as fully as it currently plans.

    The U.S. financial system stumbled into one of its most severe crises since the 1930s as rising failures in subprime mortgages drove lenders to the wall and helped drive the U.S. and much of the world economy into deep recession.

    The administration has taken unprecedented steps to inject taxpayer capital into banks to try to foster lending and, in company with the U.S. central bank, to set up facilities for buying debt to keep the financial system liquid.

    FACING BAILOUT CRITICS

    With a number of big banks now lining up to return money, some Republican lawmakers argued those repayments should pay down U.S. debt rather than be recycled for further bailouts -- an interpretation of the law that Geithner disputed.

    "I think it's important that the government ... has that flexibility, because we are still in an enormously difficult, challenging, fragile period of time and there may be circumstances where the necessary thing for the country is to use that authority carefully to support expanding these programs," he said.

    Geithner said the administration had no choice but to act aggressively to avoid a financial meltdown. He conceded, however, that winding down the government's deep involvement in business was an important challenge ahead.

    "Crises this severe don't burn themselves out. To fix them requires the action of government," he said.

    But he added it was too soon to lay out a plan for withdrawing the government's unusual support for private firms. "I'm not prepared to talk to that today," he said. "We're not quite there yet."

    SMALL BANKS TO GET AID

    Geithner said financial companies were adjusting their operations in ways that will make them less vulnerable to shocks like the one they have gone through.

    "Leverage has declined, the most vulnerable parts of the non-bank financial system no longer pose the same risk, and banks are funding themselves more conservatively," he said.

    While public attention has largely centered on big banks, including the 19 that underwent "stress tests" to see whether they needed to raise more capital, Geithner said small banks also will get an expanded chance to qualify for taxpayer aid.

    He said these companies would now have six months to make themselves into bank holding companies that would qualify for aid, or to reapply for aid if they are already eligible.

    Geithner also said a plan to entice private investors to buy distressed assets from banks by putting up government capital alongside private money -- a cornerstone of the administration's financial rescue plans -- would begin operating over the next six weeks.

    Geithner said a presidential task force set up to deal with the collapsing U.S. auto industry would keep working with General Motors Corp right up until a June 1 deadline the government has set for the automaker to come up with a viable long-term business plan. GM may need to enter bankruptcy to restructure, as the Chrysler Corp already has done.

    Geithner said the Obama administration would ensure that financing remains available for remaining creditworthy auto dealers and also will try to boost demand for new cars.

    (Additional reporting by David Lawder and Corbett B. Daly; Editing by Neil Stempleman)

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